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dc.contributor.authorKaczmarek, Marlena C
dc.contributor.authorValenti, Lisa
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Heath A
dc.contributor.authorWare, Robert S
dc.contributor.authorBritt, Helena C
dc.contributor.authorLambert, Stephen B
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-08T04:00:18Z
dc.date.available2018-05-08T04:00:18Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.issn0025-729X
dc.identifier.doi10.5694/mja13.10044
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/172345
dc.description.abstractObjective: To better understand the role that diagnostic test-ordering behaviour of general practitioners has on current pertussis epidemiology in Australia. Design and setting: Analysis of Australian general practice encounter data (from the Bettering the Evaluation and Care of Health [BEACH] program) on 13 “pertussis-related problem” (PRP) codes that were most likely to result in a pertussis laboratory test request and Australian pertussis notifications data (from the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System [NNDSS]) for the period April 2000 to March 2011. Main outcome measures: The change in the proportion of PRP general practice encounters with a pertussis test request between 2000 and 2011, and the change in national pertussis notifications over the same period. Results: The proportion of PRP encounters resulting in a pertussis test request increased from 0.25% between April 2000 and March 2004 to 1.71% between April 2010 and March 2011 (odds ratio, 7.0; 95% CI, 5.5–8.8). The BEACH data on pertussis testing and NNDSS data on pertussis notifications were highly correlated (r = 0.99), and the notification data mirrored the likelihood of a pertussis test request in general practice. The proportion of NNDSS pertussis notifications with a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-confirmed diagnosis increased from 16.3% between April 2000 and March 2004 to 65.3% between April 2010 and March 2011. Conclusion: An increase in pertussis testing following recognition of early epidemic cases may have led to identification of previously undetected infections, resulting in a further increase in notified disease and awareness among GPs. The changing likelihood of being tested may also be due to expanding availability and use of PCR testing in Australia.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherAustralasian Medical Publishing Company
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom624
dc.relation.ispartofpageto628
dc.relation.ispartofissue11
dc.relation.ispartofjournalMedical Journal of Australia
dc.relation.ispartofvolume198
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiomedical and clinical sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode32
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode52
dc.titleSevenfold rise in likelihood of Pertussis test requests in a stable set of Australian general practice encounters, 2000-2011
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyrightKaczmarek MC, Valenti L, Kelly HA, et al. Sevenfold rise in likelihood of pertussis test requests in a stable set of Australian general practice encounters, 2000–2011. Med J Aust 2013; 198 (11): 624-628. © Copyright 2013 The Medical Journal of Australia – reproduced with permission.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorWare, Robert


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