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dc.contributor.authorBrown, Ted
dc.contributor.authorBoyle, Malcolm
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Brett
dc.contributor.authorMolloy, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorMcKenna, Lisa
dc.contributor.authorPalermo, Claire
dc.contributor.authorMolloy, Liz
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-05T00:35:07Z
dc.date.available2018-01-05T00:35:07Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.issn0308-0226
dc.identifier.doi10.4276/030802211X13125646370933
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/172713
dc.description.abstractBackground: Listening and communication are two critical aspects of positive relationships. In the context of health care, they have been found to have a positive impact on many aspects of client care, including patient satisfaction, emotional wellbeing, and functional and physiological status. However, little is understood about the specific listening and communication styles exhibited by students enrolled in the health-related disciplines, including occupational therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the listening and communication styles of undergraduate occupational therapy students. Method: This was a cross-sectional study of 210 students (response rate of 95.5%) enrolled in a Bachelor of Occupational Therapy (BOT) course, who completed paper-based versions of the Listening Styles Profile (LSP) and the Communicator Style Measure (CSM). Both the LSP and CSM are valid and reliable measures. Results: Participants reported a strong preference for the People listening style and the Friendly and Attentive communication styles. A moderate preference was also shown for the Content listening style. There were only two minor differences between participants enrolled in the different year levels of the BOT course, and only minor differences between the male and female students. Conclusion: The participants' reported preferences are well suited for the role of occupational therapy. The findings suggest that occupational therapy students exhibit a disposition towards listening and communication styles that are indicative of an underlying interest in the care and welfare of others and which are traits of the ‘helping, people-oriented’ professions. The implications of these findings are that it is important to consider the listening and communication styles of occupational therapy students during their professional education and while completing practice placement education.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherSage Publications
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom387
dc.relation.ispartofpageto393
dc.relation.ispartofissue8
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBritish Journal of Occupational Therapy
dc.relation.ispartofvolume74
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110399
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.titleListening and communication styles of undergraduate occupational therapy students: A cross-sectional study
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorBoyle, Malcolm


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