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dc.contributor.authorLangley, MC
dc.contributor.authorClarkson, C
dc.contributor.authorUlm, S
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T00:50:41Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T00:50:41Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.issn0047-2484
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jhevol.2011.03.002
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/172773
dc.description.abstractOur knowledge of early Australasian societies has significantly expanded in recent decades with more than 220 Pleistocene sites reported from a range of environmental zones and depositional contexts. The uniqueness of this dataset has played an increasingly important role in global debates about the origins and expression of complex behaviour among early modern human populations. Nevertheless, discussions of Pleistocene behaviour and cultural innovation are yet to adequately consider the effects of taphonomy and archaeological sampling on the nature and representativeness of the record. Here, we investigate the effects of preservation and sampling on the archaeological record of Sahul, and explore the implications for understanding early cultural diversity and complexity. We find no evidence to support the view that Pleistocene populations of Sahul lacked cognitive modernity or cultural complexity. Instead, we argue that differences in the nature of early modern human populations across the globe were more likely the consequence of differences in population size and density, interaction and historical contingency.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherAcademic Press
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom197
dc.relation.ispartofpageto208
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Human Evolution
dc.relation.ispartofvolume61
dc.subject.fieldofresearchArchaeology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEvolutionary Biology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAnthropology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchArchaeology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode210199
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0603
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1601
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2101
dc.titleFrom small holes to grand narratives: The impact of taphonomy and sample size on the modernity debate in Australia and New Guinea
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorLangley, Michelle C.


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