Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSteel, E.J.
dc.contributor.authorLayton, N.A.
dc.contributor.authorFoster, Michele M.
dc.contributor.authorBennett, Sally
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-13T08:02:05Z
dc.date.available2018-04-13T08:02:05Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn1748-3115
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/17483107.2014.941953
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/172918
dc.description.abstractPurpose: People with disability have a right to assistive technology devices and services, to support their inclusion and participation in society. User-centred approaches aim to address consumer dissatisfaction and sub-optimal outcomes from assistive technology (AT) provision, but make assumptions of consumer literacy and empowerment. Policy discourses about consumer choice prompt careful reflection, and this paper aims to provide a critical perspective on user involvement in assistive technology provision. Methods: User-centred approaches are considered, using literature to critically reflect on what user involvement means in AT provision. Challenges at the level of interactions between practitioners and consumers, and also the level of markets and policies are discussed, using examples from Australia. Results: There is no unanimous conceptual framework for user-centred practice. Power imbalances and differing perspectives between practitioners and consumers make it difficult for consumers to feel empowered. Online access to information and international suppliers has not surmounted information asymmetries for consumers or lifted the regulation of publicly funded AT devices. Conclusions: Ensuring access and equity in the public provision of AT is challenging in an expanding market with diverse stakeholders. Consumers require personalised information and support to facilitate their involvement and choice in AT provision.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherInforma Healthcare
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom235
dc.relation.ispartofpageto240
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalDisability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume11
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111799
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.titleChallenges of user-centred assistive technology provision in Australia: Shopping without a prescription
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionPost-print
gro.rights.copyright© 2016 Taylor & Francis. This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology on 18 Jul 2014, available online: https://doi.org/10.3109/17483107.2014.941953
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorFoster, Michele M.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record