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dc.contributor.authorYilmaz, Z
dc.contributor.authorDavis, C
dc.contributor.authorLoxton, NJ
dc.contributor.authorKaplan, AS
dc.contributor.authorLevitan, RD
dc.contributor.authorCarter, JC
dc.contributor.authorKennedy, JL
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-06T03:05:26Z
dc.date.available2018-09-06T03:05:26Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn0307-0565
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/ijo.2014.79
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/173100
dc.description.abstractBackground/objectives: Melanocortins have a crucial role in appetite and weight regulation. Although the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) gene has been repeatedly linked to obesity and antipsychotic-induced weight gain, the mechanism behind how it leads to this effect in still undetermined. The goal of this study was to conduct an in-depth and sophisticated analysis of MC4R polymorphisms, body mass index (BMI), eating behavior and depressed mood. Subjects/methods: We genotyped 328 individuals of European ancestry on the following MC4R markers based on the relevant literature on obesity and antipsychotic-induced weight gain: rs571312, rs17782313, rs489693, rs11872992, and rs8087522. Height and weight were measured, and information on depressed mood and overeating behaviors was obtained during the in-person assessment. Results: BMI was associated with rs17782313 C allele; however, this finding did not survive correction for multiple testing (P=0.018). Although rs17782313 was significantly associated with depressed mood and overeating behaviors, tests of indirect effects indicated that emotional eating and food cravings, rather than depressed mood, uniquely accounted for the effect of this marker and BMI (n=152). Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the link between MC4R rs17782313, mood and overeating behavior, as well as to demonstrate possible mechanisms behind MC4R’s influence on body weight. If replicated in a larger sample, these results may have important clinical implications, including potential for the use of MC4R agonists in the treatment of obesity and disordered eating.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom114
dc.relation.ispartofpageto120
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Obesity
dc.relation.ispartofvolume39
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHealth, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170106
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode13
dc.titleAssociation between MC4R rs17782313 Polymorphism and Overeating Behaviors
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2015 Nature Publishing Group. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorLoxton, Natalie J.


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