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dc.contributor.authorHaynes, Ashleigh
dc.contributor.authorKemps, Eva
dc.contributor.authorMoffitt, Robyn
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-11T02:29:52Z
dc.date.available2018-10-11T02:29:52Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn0191-8869
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.paid.2015.09.049
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/173128
dc.description.abstractTraditionally, self-control has been conceptualized as the effortful overcoming of desires in order to enact goal-consistent behavior. Several researchers have suggested that instead, self-control is effortless, as individuals with high self-control experience less intense desire that conflicts with valued goals. The current study tested whether the relationship between trait self-control and snack intake was mediated by desire strength, or whether those with higher trait self-control were better able to overcome desire to indulge in unhealthy food, controlling for aspects of the food environment and goal motivation. A sample of women with the goal of eating healthily for weight management (N = 134) completed a lab-based assessment of snack food consumption and self-report measures of desire strength and trait self-control (generic self-control, and both inhibitory and initiatory subcomponents). As expected, desire strength mediated the relationship between generic self-control and intake, such that higher self-control was related to lower snack intake indirectly via lower desire strength. The relationship between desire and intake was consistent across self-control levels. The same pattern of results emerged for both inhibitory and initiatory self-control. These findings support the contemporary conceptualization of self-control as being effortless due to the reduced strength of unhealthy desires.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom69
dc.relation.ispartofpageto74
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPersonality and Individual Differences
dc.relation.ispartofvolume89
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHealth, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170106
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1702
dc.titleDoes trait self-control predict weaker desire for unhealthy stimuli? A lab-based study of unhealthy snack intake
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorMoffitt, Robyn L.


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