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dc.contributor.authorMelvin, Steven
dc.contributor.authorWilson, S.
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-27T03:15:53Z
dc.date.available2018-09-27T03:15:53Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.issn1879-1298en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.chemosphere.2013.07.036en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/173272
dc.description.abstractBehavioral responses have been applied for decades as tools for aquatic toxicity testing, but have received far less attention than studies assessing lethality, development or reproduction. With improved visual and non-visual assessment tools and increased knowledge of the importance of behavior for organism health and fitness, interest in behavioral analysis has increased in recent years. However, to our knowledge there has never been a quantitative assessment of the available techniques for organismal toxicity testing, so it is not clear whether behavioral studies represent valuable additions to environmental monitoring. We performed a meta-analysis comparing the relative sensitivities and average durations of behavioral studies to those assessing acute lethality, development and reproduction. Results demonstrate that the average duration of behavioral studies is consistently less than developmental or reproductive studies, and that behavioral endpoints are generally more sensitive than those assessing development or reproduction. We found effect sizes to be lower but power to be higher in behavioral and reproductive studies compared to studies assessing development, which likely relates to low sample sizes commonly used in developmental studies. Overall, we conclude that behavioral studies are comparatively fast and sensitive, and therefore warrant further attention as tools for assessing the toxicological effects of environmental contaminants. We suggest that research aimed at developing and optimizing techniques for behavioral analysis could prove extremely useful to the field of toxicology, but that future work must be directed at determining what specific behaviors are most sensitive to various classes of contaminants, and at understanding the relevance of changes to discrete behaviors for influencing organismal and population-level health and fitness.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom2217en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto2223en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue10en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalChemosphereen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume93en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEcological Applications not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050199en_US
dc.titleThe utility of behavioral studies for aquatic toxicology testing: A meta-analysisen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/en_US
dc.description.versionPublisheden_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.en_US
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