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dc.contributor.authorWake, Melissa
dc.contributor.authorTobin, Sherryn
dc.contributor.authorLevickis, Penny
dc.contributor.authorGold, Lisa
dc.contributor.authorUkoumunne, Obioha C
dc.contributor.authorZens, Naomi
dc.contributor.authorGoldfeld, Sharon
dc.contributor.authorLe, Ha
dc.contributor.authorLaw, James
dc.contributor.authorReilly, Sheena
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-27T02:47:30Z
dc.date.available2018-04-27T02:47:30Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.issn0031-4005
dc.identifier.doi10.1542/peds.2012-3878
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/173293
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Population approaches to lessen the adverse impacts of preschool language delay remain elusive. We aimed to determine whether systematic ascertainment of language delay at age 4 years, followed by a 10-month, 1-on-1 intervention, improves language and related outcomes at age 5 years. METHODS: A randomized trial nested within a cross-sectional ascertainment of language delay. Children with expressive and/or receptive language scores more than 1.25 SD below the mean at age 4 years entered the trial. Children randomly allocated to the intervention received 18 1-hour home-based therapy sessions. The primary outcomes were receptive and expressive language (Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals – Preschool, 2nd Edition) and secondary outcomes were child phonological skills, letter awareness, pragmatic skills, behavior, and quality of life. RESULTS: A total of 1464 children were assessed for language delay at age 4 years. Of 266 eligible children, 200 (13.6%) entered the trial, with 91 intervention (92% of 99) and 88 control (87% of 101) children retained at age 5 years. At age 5 years, there was weak evidence of benefit to expressive (adjusted mean difference, intervention − control, 2.0; 95% confidence interval [CI] −0.5 to 4.4; P = .12) but not receptive (0.6; 95% CI −2.5 to 3.8; P = .69) language. The intervention improved phonological awareness skills (5.0; 95% CI 2.2 to 7.8; P < .001) and letter knowledge (2.4; 95% CI 0.3 to 4.5; P = .03), but not other secondary outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: A standardized yet flexible 18-session language intervention was successfully delivered by non-specialist staff, found to be acceptable and feasible, and has the potential to improve long-term consequences of early language delay within a public health framework.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherAmerican Academy of Pediatrics
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrome895
dc.relation.ispartofpagetoe904
dc.relation.ispartofissue4
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPediatrics
dc.relation.ispartofvolume132
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology and Cognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode119999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode17
dc.titleRandomized trial of a population-based, home-delivered intervention for preschool language delay
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorReilly, Sheena
gro.griffith.authorLaw, James


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