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dc.contributor.authorBarclay, Leah
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-29T23:42:46Z
dc.date.available2018-07-29T23:42:46Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.issn1607-3304
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/173483
dc.description.abstractJohn Cage’s pivotal 1937 talk titled “!e Future of Music: Credo,” he said, “I believe that the use of noise to make music will continue and increase until we reach a music produced through the aid of electrical instruments which will make available for musical purposes any and all sounds that can be heard” (Cage 1937, 3). In 2013, Cage’s visionary genius is clearly evident with a musical world of in"nite possibilities aided by technology. !e dramatic advance-ment of technology has truly cultivated a paradigm shi# in how artists interact in both physical and virtual worlds. !ese changes have evolved and expanded our tools of expression but most impor-tantly they have opened the ability to communicate at a higher level in an interdisciplinary context. In a recent edition of “Musicworks,” Joel Chadabe stated that the current artistic practices of electroacoustic composers are rooted in the idea that new technologies, unlike traditional musical instru-ments, can produce sounds used to communicate core messages, including information about the state of our environment. He claims that we are all participating in the emergence of a new type of music accessible to anyone, which can be used to communicate ideas that relate more closely to life than those communicated through tradi-tional musical forms. He believes we need to think of ourselves as “leaders in a magni"cent revolution rather than the defenders of an isolated and besieged avant-garde” (Chadabe 2011).
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWorld Forum for Acoustic Ecology (WFAE)
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.wfae.net/uploads/5/9/8/4/59849633/soundscape_volume12.pdf
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom29
dc.relation.ispartofpageto32
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalSoundscape: The Journal of Acoustic Ecology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume12
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMusic Composition
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCommunication Technology and Digital Media Studies
dc.subject.fieldofresearchConservation and Biodiversity
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode190406
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode200102
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050202
dc.titleSonic Ecologies: Exploring the Agency of Soundscapes in Ecological Crisis
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.rights.copyrightAfter all reasonable attempts to contact the copyright owner, this work was published in good faith in interests of the digital preservation of academic scholarship. Please contact copyright@griffith.edu.au with any questions or concerns.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBarclay, Leah R.


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