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dc.contributor.authorPickering, Janessa
dc.contributor.authorSmith-Vaughan, Heidi
dc.contributor.authorBeissbarth, Jemima
dc.contributor.authorBowman, Jacinta
dc.contributor.authorWiertsema, S.
dc.contributor.authorRiley, Thomas V.
dc.contributor.authorLeach, Amanda Jane
dc.contributor.authorRichmond, Peter C.
dc.contributor.authorLehmann, Deborah
dc.contributor.authorKirkham, Lea-Ann S.
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-04T23:27:19Z
dc.date.available2018-11-04T23:27:19Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn0095-1137en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/JCM.03448-13en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/173561
dc.description.abstractNontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) strains are responsible for respiratory-related infections which cause a significant burden of disease in Australian children. We previously identified a disparity in NTHI culture-defined carriage rates between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children (42% versus 11%). The aim of this study was to use molecular techniques to accurately determine the true NTHI carriage rates (excluding other culture-identical Haemophilus spp.) and assess whether the NTHI strain diversity correlates with the disparity in NTHI carriage rates. NTHI isolates were cultured from 595 nasopharyngeal aspirates collected longitudinally from asymptomatic Aboriginal (n = 81) and non-Aboriginal (n = 76) children aged 0 to 2 years living in the Kalgoorlie-Boulder region, Western Australia. NTHI-specific 16S rRNA gene PCR and PCR ribotyping were conducted on these isolates. Confirmation of NTHI by 16S rRNA gene PCR corrected the NTHI carriage rates from 42% to 36% in Aboriginal children and from 11% to 9% in non-Aboriginal children. A total of 75 different NTHI ribotypes were identified, with 51% unique to Aboriginal children and 13% unique to non-Aboriginal children (P < 0.0001). The strain richness (proportion of different NTHI ribotypes) was similar for Aboriginal (19%, 65/346) and non-Aboriginal children (19%, 37/192) (P = 0.909). Persistent carriage of the same ribotype was rare in the two groups, but colonization with multiple NTHI strains was more common in Aboriginal children than in non-Aboriginal children. True NTHI carriage was less than that estimated by culture. The Aboriginal children were more likely to carry unique and multiple NTHI strains, which may contribute to the chronicity of NTHI colonization and subsequent disease.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1352en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1357en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue5en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Clinical Microbiologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume52en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Healthen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111701en_US
dc.titleDiversity of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae strains colonizing Australian Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal childrenen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
dc.description.versionPublisheden_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2014 American Society for Microbiology. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
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