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dc.contributor.authorMeagher, David J
dc.contributor.authorMorandi, Alessandro
dc.contributor.authorInouye, Sharon K
dc.contributor.authorEly, Wes
dc.contributor.authorAdamis, Dimitrios
dc.contributor.authorMaclullich, Alasdair J
dc.contributor.authorRudolph, James L
dc.contributor.authorNeufeld, Karin
dc.contributor.authorLeonard, Maeve
dc.contributor.authorBellelli, Giuseppe
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorTeodorczuk, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorKreisel, Stefan
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Christine
dc.contributor.authorHasemann, Wolfgang
dc.contributor.authorTimmons, Suzanne
dc.contributor.authorO'Regan, Niamh
dc.contributor.authorGrover, Sandeep
dc.contributor.authorJabbar, Faiza
dc.contributor.authorCullen, Walter
dc.contributor.authorDunne, Colum
dc.contributor.authorKamholz, Barbara
dc.contributor.authorVan Munster, Barbara C
dc.contributor.authorDe Rooij, Sophia E
dc.contributor.authorDe Jonghe, Jos
dc.contributor.authorTrzepacz, Paula T
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-19T01:31:08Z
dc.date.available2018-03-19T01:31:08Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn1741-7015
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12916-014-0164-8
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/173829
dc.description.abstractBackground: The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual fifth edition (DSM-5) provides new criteria for delirium diagnosis. We examined delirium diagnosis using these new criteria compared with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual fourth edition (DSM-IV) in a large dataset of patients assessed for delirium and related presentations. Methods: Patient data (n = 768) from six prospectively collected cohorts, clinically assessed using DSM-IV and the Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98 (DRS-R98), were pooled. Post hoc application of DRS-R98 item scores were used to rate DSM-5 criteria. ‘Strict’ and ‘relaxed’ DSM-5 criteria to ascertain delirium were compared to rates determined by DSM-IV. Results: Using DSM-IV by clinical assessment, delirium was found in 510/768 patients (66%). Strict DSM-5 criteria categorized 158 as delirious including 155 (30%) with DSM-IV delirium, whereas relaxed DSM-5 criteria identified 466 as delirious, including 455 (89%) diagnosed by DSM-IV (P <0.001). The concordance between the different diagnostic methods was: 53% (ĸ = 0.22) between DSM-IV and the strict DSM-5, 91% (ĸ = 0.82) between the DSM-IV and relaxed DSM-5 criteria and 60% (ĸ = 0.29) between the strict versus relaxed DSM-5 criteria. Only 155 cases were identified as delirium by all three approaches. The 55 (11%) patients with DSM-IV delirium who were not rated as delirious by relaxed criteria had lower mean DRS-R98 total scores than those rated as delirious (13.7 ± 3.9 versus 23.7 ± 6.0; P <0.001). Conversely, mean DRS-R98 score (21.1 ± 6.4) for the 70% not rated as delirious by strict DSM-5 criteria was consistent with suggested cutoff scores for full syndromal delirium. Only 11 cases met DSM-5 criteria that were not deemed to have DSM-IV delirium. Conclusions: The concordance between DSM-IV and the new DSM-5 delirium criteria varies considerably depending on the interpretation of criteria. Overly-strict adherence for some new text details in DSM-5 criteria would reduce the number of delirium cases diagnosed; however, a more ‘relaxed’ approach renders DSM-5 criteria comparable to DSM-IV with minimal impact on their actual application and is thus recommended.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherBioMed Central
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom164-1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto164-10
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBMC Medicine
dc.relation.ispartofvolume12
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110399
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.titleConcordance between DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria for delirium diagnosis in a pooled database of 768 prospectively evaluated patients using the delirium rating scale-revised-98
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© 2014 Meagher et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorTeodorczuk, Andrew


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