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dc.contributor.authorGamble, Jenniferen_US
dc.contributor.authorCreedy, Debraen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcCourt, Chrisen_US
dc.contributor.authorWeaver, Janeen_US
dc.contributor.authorBeake, Sarahen_US
dc.contributor.editorDiony Youngen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T09:24:04Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T09:24:04Z
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.date.modified2013-07-30T23:57:17Z
dc.identifier.issn07307659en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1523-536X.2007.00193.xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/17555
dc.description.abstractBackground: The influence of women's birth preferences on the rising cesarean section rates is uncertain and possibly changing. This review of publications relating to women's request for cesarean delivery explores assumptions related to the social, cultural, and political-economic contexts of maternity care and decision making. Method: A search of major databases was undertaken using the following terms: "c(a)esarean section" with "maternal request,""decision-making,""patient participation,""decision-making-patient,""patient satisfaction,""patient preference,""maternal choice,""on demand," and "consumer demand." Seventeen papers examining women's preferred type of birth were retrieved. Results: No studies systematically examined information provided to women by health professionals to inform their decision. Some studies did not adequately acknowledge the influence of obstetric and psychological factors in relation to women's request for a cesarean section. Other potential influences were poorly addressed, including whether or not the doctor advised a vaginal birth, women's access to midwifery care in pregnancy, information provision, quality of care, and cultural issues. Discussion: The psychosocial context of obstetric care reveals a power imbalance in favor of physicians. Research into decision making about cesarean section that does not account for the way care is offered, observe interactions between women and practitioners, and analyze the context of care should be interpreted with caution.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Incen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom331en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto340en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBirthen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume34en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode321214en_US
dc.titleA Critique of the Literature on Women's Request for Cesarean Sectionen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Nursing and Midwiferyen_US
gro.date.issued2007
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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