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dc.contributor.authorOrr, Graeme
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-13T03:12:06Z
dc.date.available2019-05-13T03:12:06Z
dc.date.issued1994
dc.identifier.issn10383441en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/176659
dc.description.abstractThis is an intriguing study of the role of interpreters in the Australian legal system, because in addition to comprehensively describing the legal and professional context in which interpreters work, it also offers a re­conceptualisation of that role. Part way through the book, I was struck by the self-conscious use of 'sic' by the authors following a quoted reference to interpreters as 'translators'. Clearly everyday language distinguishes between 'interpreting' and 'translating'. 'Translating' is pre-eminently the rendering of documents and written texts into another language; 'interpreting' is archetypically the immediate translation of spoken words. But I wondered if there was not more to the distinction than that. Weekley's etymological dictionary being handy (in both senses of the word), I soon learnt that 'interpret' harkens back to the Latin for agent or translator, with possible origins in the idea of one who helped make a bargain - the 'pret' suffix suggests 'price'. 'Translate', however, originally meant 'to bear across'. The interpreter then was one who acted as a go-between, helping to strike a bargain, but who remained allied to one party. The translator, perhaps, was more interested in the lofty task of capturing and carrying some idealised meaning.en_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherGriffith Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeBrisbaneen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://classic.austlii.edu.au/au/journals/GriffLawRw/1994/4.htmlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom156en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto160en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalGriffith Law Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume3en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111199en_US
dc.titleReview of Interpreters and the legal system by Kathy Laster and Veronica Tayloren_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC4 - Letter or Note [DO NOT USE]en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
dc.description.versionPublisheden_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Lawen_US
gro.rights.copyright© 1994 Griffith Law School. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorOrr, Graeme D.


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