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dc.contributor.authorSzvetko, Attilaen_US
dc.contributor.authorFowdar, Javeden_US
dc.contributor.authorNelson, Jessicaen_US
dc.contributor.authorColson, Natalieen_US
dc.contributor.authorTajouri, Lotfien_US
dc.contributor.authorCsurhes, P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPender, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGriffiths, Lynen_US
dc.contributor.editorJournal of the Neurological Sciencesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T08:59:28Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T08:59:28Z
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.date.modified2010-01-07T06:44:25Z
dc.identifier.issn0022510Xen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jns.2006.10.006en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/17777
dc.description.abstractMultiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex neurological disease that affects the central nervous system (CNS) resulting in debilitating neuropathology. Pathogenesis is primarily defined by CNS inflammation and demyelination of nerve axons. Methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) is an enzyme that catalyzes the remethylation of homocysteine (Hcy) to methionine via cobalamin and folate dependant reactions. Cobalamin acts as an intermediate methyl carrier between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and Hcy. MTRR plays a critical role in maintaining cobalamin in an active form and is consequently an important determinant of total plasma Hcy (pHcy) concentrations. Elevated intracellular pHcy levels have been suggested to play a role in CNS dysfunction, neurodegenerative, and cerebrovascular diseases. Our investigation entailed the genotyping of a cohort of 140 cases and matched controls for MTRR and MTHFR, by restriction length polymorphism (RFLP) techniques. Two polymorphisms: MTRR A66G and MTHFR A1298C were investigated in an Australian age and gender matched case-control study. No significant allelic frequency difference was observed between cases and controls at the alpha=0.05 level (MTRR chi(2)=0.005, P=0.95, MTHFR chi(2)=1.15, P=0.28). Our preliminary findings suggest no association between the MTRR A66G and MTHFR A1298C polymorphisms and MS.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherJournal of the Neurological Sciencesen_US
dc.publisher.placeThe Netherlandsen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/506078/description#descriptionen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom49en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto52en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of the Neurological Sciencesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume252en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode270210en_US
dc.titleNo association between MTHFR A1298C and MTRR A66G polymorphisms, and MS in an Australian cohorten_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Medical Scienceen_US
gro.date.issued2007
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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