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dc.contributor.authorConrick, Moya
dc.contributor.authorDunne, Anne
dc.contributor.authorSkinner, Jan
dc.contributor.editorCleasby, P
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-15T22:27:24Z
dc.date.available2019-05-15T22:27:24Z
dc.date.issued1995
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/177987
dc.description.abstractSimulation is recognised as one of the more effective methods of managing clinical teaching. It can be presented in many ways - role-plays, games and computer programs; it encourages the student to become an active participant, to think more deeply and to become part of the educational environment. In the first year at Griffith University, a curriculum which uses a Problem Based Learning philosophy, it was decided to use a simulated ward to foster the integration of theory and practice before students went to the institutions for clinical practice. It was hoped to capture the advantages of simulation for example the controlled manipulation of the patient care situation with fairly predictable results and the creation of a safe environment allowing the patient to escape the consequences of poor decisions made by a learner or an ill-informed care giver. The simulation was to involve all students in all facets of the day to day activities of a busy ward and to expose them to a diverse array of roles within that setting. This paper discusses the organisational factors in such an undertaking and educational outcomes achieved. It will also give an insight into the student reactions to and reflections on the week.en_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherCharles Sturt Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeBathursten_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://pandora.nla.gov.au/nph-wb/19971223130000/http://www.csu.edu.au/faculty/health/nurshealth/aejne/vol1-1/ajan4.htmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalThe Australian Electronic Journal of Nursing Educationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume1en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchTECHNOLOGYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode100000en_US
dc.titleLearning together: Using Simulation to Foster the Integration of Theory and Practiceen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC3 - Letter or Noteen_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
dc.description.versionPublisheden_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Nursing and Midwiferyen_US
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 1995 The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this journal please refer to the journal’s website or contact the author(s).en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorConrick, Moya
gro.griffith.authorSkinner, Jan
gro.griffith.authorDunne, Anne


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