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dc.contributor.authorSingh, Parlo
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-18T04:45:30Z
dc.date.available2019-06-18T04:45:30Z
dc.date.issued1997
dc.identifier.issn0142-5692en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/0142569970180107en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/179820
dc.description.abstractBernstein's analysis of the organisation and distribution of educational knowledge was originally proposed over 30 years ago. In his important new book, Bernstein formulates a comprehensive model of the structuring of pedagogic communication from the principles yielded by his on-going research in the ensuing decades. The model focuses on how different ways of selecting and putting curricular knowledge together produce different identities and relations in pedagogic contexts. Formulated with reference to the substantial restructuring of educational systems which has occurred since the 1960s, the model attempts to understand emerging forms of curricular organisation and the attendant production of educational identities. Bernstein's work is notably controversial. For over three decades it has been discussed, debated, tested and challenged. One persistent criticism is that Bernstien presents a deficit model of working class language. This interpretation arose from the erroneous assumption that Bernstein's use of terminology such as 'restrictive' and 'elaborated' codes was a claim about essential differences between working and middle class people, rather than a description of learned forms of language use complexly caught up in relation of class power in educational institutions. This is an example of the criticism that Bernstein's work attends inadequately to the relational dimensions of class. It is connected to the more general criticism that Bernstein's work is overly functionalist; technical, at the expense of theorising social relationships; and insufficiently illustrated with reference to real schools (McFadden, 1995).en_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherCarfaxen_US
dc.publisher.placeLondonen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom119en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto124en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBritish Journal of Sociology of Educationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume18en_US
dc.titleReview Essay: Basil Bernstein (1996). Pedagogy, symbolic control and identity.en_US
dc.typeReporten_US
dc.type.descriptionD Major Reviews/Reportsen_US
dc.type.codeD - Reviews/Reportsen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Education and Professional Studiesen_US
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorSingh, Parlo


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