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dc.contributor.convenorSteve Hamnetten_AU
dc.contributor.authorEvans, Ricken_US
dc.contributor.authorBurke, Matthewen_US
dc.contributor.authorDodson, Jagoen_US
dc.contributor.editorSteve Hamnetten_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:07:55Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:07:55Z
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.date.modified2009-10-14T22:11:31Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/17993
dc.description.abstractIn no field of planning is there more reliance on technical-rational decision-making processes than transportation planning. In Australian cities transport planners still heavily rely upon complex, quantitative transport models, especially the four-step model (FSM) and its variants, used at the regional, metropolitan and corridor levels of analysis. While it is beyond the scope of this paper to provide a detailed critique of each stage of the FSM, there are numerous problems with its use that need to be addressed. This paper examines the empirical shortfalls of the technical-rational process, highlighting the reliance on a select few experts, limited public participation in modelling processes, and decision-makers who have little understanding of the methodological limitations inherent in transport modelling advice. Model deficiencies do not allow for, and may actually impede consideration of many of the most important emerging issues within cities, including road pricing, climate change and oil vulnerability, as well as long-held concerns such as land use changes, induced travel, the environment and sustainability. This paper identifies numerous inter-related concerns about the broader policy and political dimensions of technical-rational decision-making in the transport sector, and recognises the main tools used in technical assessments.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent61826 bytes
dc.format.extent38386 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherUniversity of South Australiaen_US
dc.publisher.placeAdelaideen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.unisa.edu.au/en_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.unisa.edu.au/isst/default2.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameState of Australian Cities National Conference 2007en_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleProceedings of State of Australian Cities National Conference 2007en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2007-11-28en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2007-11-30en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationAdelaide, Australiaen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode310103en_US
dc.titleClothing the Emperor?: Transport modelling and decision-making in Australian citiesen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2007. The attached file is reproduced here with permission of the copyright owners for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted. For information about this conference please refer to the publisher's website or contact the authors.en_AU
gro.date.issued2007
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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