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dc.contributor.authorHuang, Andrewen_US
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Rodneyen_US
dc.contributor.authorDoh, Jeung-Hwanen_US
dc.contributor.authorSong, Dennisen_US
dc.contributor.editorSyed M. Ahmed, Salman Azhar, Sherif Mohameden_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T08:32:32Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T08:32:32Z
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.date.modified2008-11-12T07:08:39Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://www.fiu.edu/~citc/en_AU
dc.identifier.doihttps://www.aiqs.com.au/index.aspen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/18027
dc.description.abstractAs buildings inevitably increase in height, vertical support elements (e.g. columns and shear walls) in tall buildings are required to carry vertical load increments from a number of floors. Therefore, axial shortening of vertical elements due to long term creep and shrinkage effects is inevitable in reinforced concrete buildings. However, the calculation of reliable values for axial shortening is not a straight forward task. All parameters may be uncertain or may not be available at the design stage. Recently, engineers have also become concerned with differential shortening of adjacent vertical elements, particularly in the lower and basement levels of super high rise structures. Largely varied values and rates for axial shortening of adjacent support elements is not only a concern for vertical deformation, but can critically impact on the performance of horizontal structural elements such as beams and slabs. This research aims to develop a robust possibility-based differential shortening prediction framework, and associated risk distribution profiles, which overcomes the deficiencies in the current models for predicting axial column shortening in reinforced concrete high rise buildings.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent368697 bytes
dc.format.extent21680 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherFlorida International University, Miami, Florida, USAen_US
dc.publisher.placeFlorida International University, Miami, Florida, USAen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.fiu.edu/~citc/citc4/index.htmen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationYen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameFourth International Conference on Construction in the 21st Century (CITC-IV)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleProceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Construction in the 21st Century : Accelerating Innovation in Engineering, Management and Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2007-07-11en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2007-07-13en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationGold Coast, Australiaen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode310201en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode290801en_US
dc.titleRisk Distribution Profile for Differential Column Shortenging Using a Possibility Theory Approachen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Engineeringen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2007 CITC-IV, USA. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Use hypertext link for access to conference website.en_AU
gro.date.issued2007
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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