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dc.contributor.authorMcKay, Belindaen_US
dc.contributor.editorBelinda McKay and Yorick Smaalen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:33:30Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:33:30Z
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.date.modified2009-11-06T05:46:44Z
dc.identifier.issn13218166en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/18150
dc.description.abstractThe emergence of modern queer identities is usually located in cities - initially the European and American metropolises, followed by provincial or colonial cities like Sydney. While the argument that a critical mass of people triggers the formation of new identities is compelling, a centralised, urban model of the generation of modern queer identities ignores an alternative theoretical model emphasising flow and connection between the 'centre' and the 'margins' that has emerged in writing about colonial and post-colonial cultures, but which has a wider applicability in understanding cultural change. In this paper, I argue that marginalised same-sex behaviours and relationships on the periphery of the empire or the nation are implicated in larger patterns of interconnectedness and reciprocity in the historical formation of modern sexual identities. Specifically, I use a family study to explore manifestations of same-sex attraction in early twentieth century Cooktown and the influence of these sexual role models on three subsequent generations. While most previous studies have analysed public records to uncover the history of gay, lesbian or 'queer' culture in Queensland, I examine private life and domestic space, using oral history, letters, and photographs to explore the 'queer' lives of Carlton Olive and his sister Gladys Olive and three subsequent generations of their family. I argue that a particular form of post-Enlightenment Protestant ethic within the family, and the conditions of life in colonial and early twentieth century Cooktown, enabled Carlton Olive, his sister Gladys Olive and her life partner Nell Ferguson to establish an anomalous family unit - non-heteronormative, multi-ethnic and relatively opaque to external scrutiny - in Cooktown in the 1930s. For Gladys and Nell, the move from remote Cooktown to the larger centres of Ayr and then Brisbane represented, ironically, a loss of self-determination in many respects. However, the influence of the lifestyles pioneered by this generation on three subsequent generations of their family demonstrates that modernising forces in the field of sexuality come not only from metropolitan experiences, but also - through reciprocal flows of ideas and people - from experiences developed in response to the conditions of life in remote outposts of empire.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent1966233 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherUniversity of Queensland Pressen_US
dc.publisher.placeSt. Lucia, Qld.en_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.griffith.edu.au/arts-languages-criminology/centre-public-culture-ideas/publications/queensland-reviewen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom29en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto54en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalQueensland Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume14en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode420303en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode430101en_US
dc.titleAnd They Sleep Together Like Husband and Wife: A Queer Queensland Genealogyen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Humanities, Languages and Social Sciencesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2007 University of Queensland Press. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2007
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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