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dc.contributor.authorLebler, Donen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T10:23:04Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T10:23:04Z
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.date.modified2008-12-17T01:01:08Z
dc.identifier.issn02557614en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0255761407083575en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/18498
dc.description.abstractIf the modern conservatorium is to prosper in a rapidly changing cultural and economic landscape, it will need to provide a learning experience that produces multi-skilled and adaptable graduates who are self-monitoring and self-directing. By implication, teaching practices that have dominated in the past will need to be re-thought, and alternatives considered that are likely to produce graduates with the abilities and attributes necessary to adapt readily to a changing environment. As a response to this imperative, one con- servatorium has developed a pedagogical approach based on the creation of a scaffolded self-directed learning community, a master-less studio. It is embedded in a popular music programme that explicitly values the development of learning characteristics that will help graduates deal with an unpredictable future. Student feedback on the impact of these practices has been gathered during the evolution of this process. It includes survey data, formal and informal student feedback, and a number of interviews in which students describe how aspects of this learning-centred approach have interacted with their music- making and their career expectations. From this feedback, it is evident that greater stu- dent autonomy and self-efficacy result from the a-synchronous reflection on performance that is enabled through recording, the self-reflection that is required by self-assessing, and the reflections on the work of others that peer-based assessment demands.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent310063 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherInternational Society for Music Educationen_US
dc.publisher.placeNedlands, WAen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.sagepub.co.uk/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201697en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom205en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto221en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Music Educationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume25en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode339999en_US
dc.titleStudent-as-master? Reflections on a learning innovation in popular music pedagogyen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, Queensland Conservatoriumen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2007 SAGE Publications. This is the author-manuscript version of the paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2007
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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