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dc.contributor.authorO'Faircheallaigh, Ciaranen_US
dc.contributor.editorJulia Mansour, Luke Tayloren_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T08:27:16Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T08:27:16Z
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.date.modified2008-05-09T08:15:03Z
dc.identifier.issn13237756en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/18641
dc.description.abstractHistorically Aboriginal people have had limited capacity to derive economic benefits from mineral development in Australia, reflecting their general economic marginalization and in particular their inability to participate in markets for factors of production (land, labour, minerals) required by the mining industry. The legal recognition of native title and the introduction of cultural heritage legislation could potentially confer on Aboriginal people significant commercial leverage and so allow them to share in the benefits generated by the exploitation of Australia's mineral resources. This paper argues that the nature of native title and cultural heritage legislation, federal government policies, the operation of the National Native Title Tribunal, and recent Federal and High Court decisions on native title, together undermine the ability of Aboriginal people to achieve in practice the commercial leverage potentially available to them. Some Aboriginal organizations are successfully employing political strategies to shore up the economic power of the people they represent, but many are not in a position to do so. I argue that these outcomes are profoundly inequitable in a society where markets play an increasingly dominant role in allocating resources, and run contrary to the thrust of federal indigenous policy which rests heavily on achieving greater Aboriginal participation in the 'real economy'.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherIndigenous Law Centre, University of New South Walesen_US
dc.publisher.placeSydneyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom28en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto42en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Indigenous Law Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume11en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode360201en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode369999en_US
dc.title'Unreasonable and Extraordinary Restraints': Native Title, Markets and Australia's Resources Boomen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, School of Government and International Relationsen_US
gro.date.issued2007
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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