Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorvan Acker, Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.editorMonash Universityen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T09:06:37Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T09:06:37Z
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.date.modified2008-05-22T07:07:39Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://arts.monash.edu.au/psi/news-and-events/apsa/refereed-papers/index.phpen_AU
dc.identifier.doihttp://www.auspsa.org.au/en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/18643
dc.description.abstractIn Australia, the federal government is attempting to strengthen families at a time when women and men have greater choice in terms of how they conduct their personal relationships. This article compares the 'soft' social policies that provide family relationship programs with the 'hard' economic policies of labour market reforms. It analyses some of the policies that affect work life balance, demonstrating that while the federal government is prepared to invest in programs to strengthen family relationships, it does not invest sufficiently in other measures such as family friendly work policies and paid maternity leave. The government's rhetoric promotes the wellbeing of 'the family'; its policies do not. On the one hand, the government attempts to encourage robust relationships by investing in early intervention programs. It has also recently invested in Family Relationship Centres to facilitate the process of family relationships breakdown. On the other hand, it is increasing the demands on labour. These policies are inconsistent in supporting families. In fact, there is a lack of wholeof- government policy development dealing with work and family issues. Consequently, individuals attempting to manage their private relationships and working lives often have inadequate options when endeavouring to balance the two.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent77523 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherMonash Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeMelbourneen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://arts.monash.edu.au/psi/news-and-events/apsa/en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameAustralasian Political Studies Association (APSA) Annual Conferenceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleAustralasian Political Studies Association (APSA) Annual Conferenceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2007-09-24en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2007-09-26en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationMonash University, Melbourneen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode369999en_US
dc.titleHoward’s Social Policies Concerning Relationships, Work and Familiesen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the author 2007. The attached file is posted here with permission of the copyright owner for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted. For information about this conference please refer to the publisher's website or contact the author.en_AU
gro.date.issued2007
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Conference outputs
    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

Show simple item record