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dc.contributor.convenorPeter Roennfeldten_AU
dc.contributor.authorHarrison, Scotten_US
dc.contributor.authorBallantyne, Julieen_US
dc.contributor.authorBarrett, Margareten_US
dc.contributor.authorTemmerman, Nitaen_US
dc.contributor.editorCatherine Granten_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:37:32Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:37:32Z
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.date.modified2009-10-14T22:14:27Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://www.nactmus.org.au/NACTMUS2007/index.htmlen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/18886
dc.description.abstractIsolation is a theme that is synonymous with Australia's demography and geography, with its population concentrated in clusters and separated by large distances. The distribution of the tertiary music education community in Australia tends to reflect aspects of the country's physical make-up, specifically the separation of individuals or small groups of academics by vast distances. Consequently, music teacher education in Australia suffers from a sense of solitude. Academics in the field typically work alone in institutions and their students, beginning music teachers, also suffer from the experience of being alone in their work environment. In a funded cross-institutional project, aspects of mentoring and peer collaboration have been explored to address this phenomenon. This paper reports on the initial stages of the project. Problem-based learning through virtual learning sites and discussion groups has been employed in the project design. These strategies have been employed as project participants endeavour to construct a music education community that reaches out across these vast distances, and contributes to academic development and collaboration. Models aimed at minimising barriers between teacher education course structures and academic experiences across Australia have been implemented. The findings of the pilot stages are revealed through the voices of academics, tertiary students and the public speaking about their involvement with innovative approaches to music teaching and learning.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent573840 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherGriffith Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeBrisbaneen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.nactmus.org.au/en_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.nactmus.org.au/musical_culture_of_australia_2007.phpen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameNational Council of Tertiary Music Schools (NACTMUS) National Conference 2007en_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleNACTMUS - Music in Australian Tertiary Institutions: Issues for the 21st Centuryen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2007-06-29en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2007-07-01en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationBrisbaneen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode330399en_US
dc.titleBuilding communities of music education practice: Peer Collaboration in music teacher education.en_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, Queensland Conservatoriumen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2007 jointly held by NACTMUS and the authors. The attached file is posted here with permission of the copyright owners for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted.For information about this conference please refer to the publisher's website or contact the authors.en_AU
gro.date.issued2007
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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  • Conference outputs
    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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