Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPritchard, Billen_US
dc.contributor.authorBurch, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.authorLawrence, Geoffreyen_US
dc.contributor.editorPaul Clokeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:10:28Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:10:28Z
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.date.modified2008-05-22T07:09:35Z
dc.identifier.issn0743-0167en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/19020
dc.description.abstractFor the past two decades there has been much debate about the future of family farming. The basic question on which this debate has turned is whether current pressures on family farm systems should be understood as symptomatic of a terminal condition, in which farmers are replaced progressively by corporate ownership; or whether family farms will persist as a social formation, albeit increasingly subsumed by off-farm interests. Using evidence from the Australian processing tomato sector, this article documents the changing social and economic formation of 'family farming'. We argue that in this industry, the appropriate way to describe farmers is through the deployment of that a new category of farming; farm family entrepreneurs. This phrase is coined to describe the situation where family units remain at the social and economic heart of farm ownership and operation, but in the context where they relate to their land-based assets through legal and financial structures characteristic of the wider economy. As this article explores, this formation seems to represent an accommodating modus operandi for farm units within neo-liberal agricultural governance. Nevertheless, however, this duality of family-based structures and capitalist entrepreneurialism inevitably provokes a series of tensions, whose resolution requires a variety of organizational strategies to be put in place.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd.en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom75en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto87en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Rural Studiesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume23en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode369999en_US
dc.titleNeither ‘Family’ Nor ‘Corporate’ Farming: Australian Tomato Growers as Farm Family Entrepreneursen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.date.issued2007
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorBurch, David F.


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record