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dc.contributor.authorMcCourt, Chrisen_US
dc.contributor.authorWeaver, Janeen_US
dc.contributor.authorStatham, Helenen_US
dc.contributor.authorBeake, Sarahen_US
dc.contributor.authorGamble, Jenniferen_US
dc.contributor.authorCreedy, Debraen_US
dc.contributor.editorDiony Youngen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:15:18Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:15:18Z
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.date.modified2013-07-30T23:56:06Z
dc.identifier.issn07307659en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1523-536X.2006.00147.xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/19194
dc.description.abstractBackground: The cesarean section rate continues to rise in many countries with routine access to medical services, yet this increase is not associated with improvement in perinatal mortality or morbidity. A large number of commentaries in the medical literature and media suggest that consumer demand contributes significantly to the continued rise of births by cesarean section internationally. The objective of this article was to critically review the research literature concerning women's preference or request for elective cesarean section published since that critiqued by Gamble and Creedy in 2000. Methods: A search of key databases using a range of search terms produced over 200 articles, of which 80 were potentially relevant. Of these, 38 were research-based articles and 40 were opinion-based articles. A total of 17 articles fitted the criteria for review. A range of methodologies was used, with varying quality, making meta-analysis of findings inappropriate, and simple summaries of results difficult to produce. Results: The range and quality of studies had increased since 2001, reflecting continuing concern. Women's preference for cesarean section varied from 0.3 to 14 percent; however, only 3 studies looked directly at this preference in the absence of clinical indications. Women's preference for a cesarean section related to psychological factors, perceptions of safety, or in some countries, was influenced by cultural or social factors. Conclusions: Research between 2000 and 2005 shows evidence of very small numbers of women requesting a cesarean section. A range of personal and societal reasons, including fear of birth and perceived inequality and inadequacy of care, underpinned these requests.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Incen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom65en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto79en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBirth: Issues in Perinatal Careen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume34en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode321214en_US
dc.titleElective cesarean section and decision making: a critical review of the literatureen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.date.issued2007
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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