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dc.contributor.authorAsadi, H
dc.contributor.authorGnadiri, H
dc.contributor.authorRose, CW
dc.contributor.authorRouhipour, H
dc.contributor.editorMichael Kirkby
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:33:47Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:33:47Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.date.modified2009-10-01T05:56:34Z
dc.identifier.issn0197-9337
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/esp.1426
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/19242
dc.description.abstractSoil erosion by water is mostly the result of rainfall-driven and runoff-driven processes taking place simultaneously during a storm event. However, the effect of interaction between these two erosion processes has received limited attention. Most laboratory experiments indicate that the rate of erosion in a rain-impacted flow is greater than for un-impacted flows of similar depth and velocity, however negative interaction between the two processes has also been reported. There is no provision for any such interaction in any of the current erosion models. This paper reports on the results of a number of exact experiments on three soil types carried out in the flume of Griffith University's large Rainfall simulator to study interaction between rain and runoff processes. The results show that interaction is generally positive under approximately steady state condition and there is very limited sign of negative interaction reported by others. Results provide strong evidence that raindrops continuously peel fine sediment from larger stable aggregates. This mechanism could be the reason for positive interaction during simultaneous rainfall and flow driven erosion in well aggregated soils as a result of increased fine particles in the eroded sediment. Strong positive interaction between rain and runoff erosion also occurs for medium to large aggregates. This strongly suggests that mechanisms which are not well understood are operational. It is quite possible that particle movement can be stimulated by rolling or creeping in a size-selective manner. Indeed, such additional mechanisms may well be largely responsible for the positive interaction observed between rain and surface flow.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.publisher.urihttp://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/117935722/grouphome/home.html
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom711
dc.relation.ispartofpageto724
dc.relation.ispartofissue5
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEarth Surface Processes and Landforms
dc.relation.ispartofvolume32
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchGeology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPhysical Geography and Environmental Geoscience
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0403
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0406
dc.titleInterrill soil erosion processes and their interaction on low slopes
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environment
gro.rights.copyright© 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Self-archiving of the author-manuscript version is not yet supported by this publisher. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version or contact the author for more information.
gro.date.issued2007
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorRose, Calvin W.
gro.griffith.authorGhadiri, Hossein
gro.griffith.authorAsadi, Hossein


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    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

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