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dc.contributor.authorVan Staden, Rudien_US
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Hongen_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Newellen_US
dc.contributor.authorLoo, Yew-Chayeen_US
dc.contributor.authorMeredith, Neilen_US
dc.contributor.editorNiklaus P. Langen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T10:16:01Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T10:16:01Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.date.modified2009-02-20T05:34:52Z
dc.identifier.issn09057161en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0501.2007.01427.xen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/21401
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Using the finite element method (FEM), the insertion process of a dental implant into a section of the human mandible is analysed. The ultimate aim of this article is to advance the use of an innovative engineering approach in dental practices, especially in the process of dental implantation. Material and methods: The FEM and analysis techniques are used to replicate and evaluate the stress profile created within the mandible during the implantation process Results: The von Mises stress profiles in both cancellous and cortical bone are examined during implant insertion. The applied torque and the insertion stage are found to strongly influence the resulting stress profile within the surrounding jawbone. Conclusions: Through the combination of both dental and engineering expertise, a simplified and efficient modeling technique is developed. This improves the understanding of the biomechanical reaction that the jawbone exhibits due to the insertion of implant. The current research is a pilot study using the FEM to model and simulate the dental implantation process. The assumptions made in the modeling and simulation process are: (1) the implantation process is simulated as a step-wise process instead of a continuous process; (2) the implant is parallel threaded and the implant does not rotate during insertion into the jawbone. Although the modeling and simulation techniques had to be simplified, a significant amount of information is gained that helps lay a good foundation for future research. Recommendations for future studies include the variation of the torque applied during the implantation process and upgrading the software capabilities to simulate the full dynamical process of implantation.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent2596526 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherBlackwell Munksgaarden_US
dc.publisher.placeDenmarken_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0905-7161&site=1en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom303en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto313en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalClinical Oral Implants Researchen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume19en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode291599en_US
dc.titleStep-wise analysis of the dental implant insertion process using the finite element techniqueen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Engineeringen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2008 Wiley-Blackwell Publishing. This is the author-manuscript version of the paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. The definitive version is available at www.interscience.wiley.comen_AU
gro.date.issued2008
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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