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dc.contributor.authorWilson, ECF
dc.contributor.authorMcKeen, ES
dc.contributor.authorScuffham, PA
dc.contributor.authorBrown, MCJ
dc.contributor.authorWylie, K
dc.contributor.authorHackett, G
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:06:33Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:06:33Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.date.modified2010-06-24T05:18:38Z
dc.identifier.issn1170-7690
dc.identifier.doi10.2165/00019053-200220130-00002
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/21545
dc.description.abstractObjective: To estimate the annual direct cost of managing erectile dysfunction (ED) to the UK National Health Service (NHS) and to examine the impact of the introduction of sildenafil in 1998 and Schedule 11 restrictions in 1999. Design: A prevalence-based cost-of-illness approach was used. The period 1997 to 2000 was covered. The numbers of ED prescriptions, prosthesis implantations and general practitioner (GP) consultations were retrieved retrospectively from UK resource utilisation databases. The number of specialist consultations and psychosexual therapy sessions were estimated from NHS clinic data. National resource unit costs were applied. Main outcomes and results: Between 1997 and 2000 the number of men presenting with ED increased from 79 800 to 257 984. The cost to the NHS increased from 㲹.4 million to 㷳.8 million (2000 estimates). The cost per patient fell from 㳶8 to 㲸6. In 1997, most NHS costs came from psychosexual therapy (30.7%), specialist consultations (20.2%) and intracavernosal injections (26.6%). By 2000, NHS costs came primarily from specialist consultations (32.0%), sildenafil prescriptions (26.2%), psychosexual therapy (13.6%) and GP consultations (12.0%). The annual cost was most sensitive to the number of drug prescriptions and specialist consultations. Conclusions: The increased NHS cost of managing ED was due mainly to a three-fold increase in the number of men presenting to GPs, substantial numbers of whom were then referred for specialist consultations under Schedule 11 restrictions. This naturally resulted in the increased use of all resources including sildenafil. The cost effectiveness of transferring prescribing responsibility in cases of severe distress from specialists to GPs in primary care remains to be determined.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherAdis International
dc.publisher.placeAuckland New Zealand
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom879
dc.relation.ispartofpageto889
dc.relation.ispartofissue13
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPharmacoEconomics
dc.relation.ispartofvolume20
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiomedical and clinical sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEconomics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode32
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode38
dc.titleThe cost to the United Kingdom National Health Service of managing erectile dysfunction: the impact of Sildenafil and prescribing restrictions
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.rights.copyright© 2002 Adis Data Information BV. Self-archiving of the author-manuscript version is not yet supported by this publisher. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version or contact the author[s] for more information.
gro.date.issued2002
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorScuffham, Paul A.


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