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dc.contributor.authorGowardman, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorK. Robertson, Iainen_US
dc.contributor.authorParkes, Scotten_US
dc.contributor.authorRickard, Claireen_US
dc.contributor.editorDr. L Brochard (Editor-in-Chief)en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T12:57:51Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T12:57:51Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.date.modified2009-03-12T06:33:40Z
dc.identifier.issn03424642en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00134-008-1046-3en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/21668
dc.description.abstractObjective To compare colonization and catheter-related bloodstream infection (CR-BSI) rates among three insertion sites (subclavian, internal jugular, femoral) used for central venous catheter (CVC) placement. Design Twenty-four-month prospective study, with relative effects analyzed by Cox proportional hazards regression. Setting Eight-bed intensive care unit. Patients Four hundred and ten critically ill patients requiring CVC placement. Measurements and results All short-term multi-lumen CVCs, including antimicrobial-coated devices, were studied with management standardized. Six hundred and five CVCs (4,040 catheter days) were analyzed. Colonization and CR-BSI incidence were, respectively, 15.1 (95% CI 13.5-21.0) and 1.8 (95% CI 1.2-4.2) per 1,000 catheter-days. Colonization was higher at the internal jugular (HR 3.64; 95% CI 1.32-10.00; p?=?0.01) and femoral (HR 5.15; 95% CI 1.82-14.51; p?=?0.004) sites than at the subclavian site. The femoral site carried a greater risk of being colonized by non-S. epidermidis species than the subclavian and internal jugular sites combined (HR 4.15; 95% CI 1.79-9.61; p?=?0.001). CVCs inserted in the Department of Emergency Medicine were more colonized than those inserted in the ICU or operating room (HR 2.66; 95% CI 1.27-5.56; p?=?0.01), and CVCs were less colonized in females than in males (HR 0.49; 95% CI 0.26-0.89; p?=?0.02). No difference in CR-BSI rates was noted between the three sites. Conclusions Colonization was lowest at the subclavian site. Regional differences exist with respect to type of pathogen isolated. Colonization was influenced by insertion location and gender. The incidence of CR-BSI was not different.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent269409 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSpringer Berlinen_US
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.springer.com/medicine/journal/134en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1038en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1045en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue6en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalIntensive Care Medicineen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume34en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode321103en_US
dc.titleInfluence of insertion site on central venous catheter colonization and bloodstream infection ratesen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Nursing and Midwiferyen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2008 Springer-Verlag. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. The original publication is available at www.springerlink.comen_AU
gro.date.issued2008
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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