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dc.contributor.authorBriody, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorPrenzler, Timothyen_US
dc.contributor.editorJames Robertsonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:04:28Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:04:28Z
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.date.modified2009-09-22T05:49:09Z
dc.identifier.issn0045-0618en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00450610509410617en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/21792
dc.description.abstractThis article examines the potential for the Australian national criminal deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) database in its application to high volume property crimes, such as burglaries and motor vehicle thefts, and is based primarily on UK data. The potential capacity for police to achieve convictions from reported property offences, and to lower crime levels, was assessed by analysing UK Forensic Science Service and Police inspection reports. The UK national criminal DNA database was selected for examination, as it is the world's longest established and claims the highest "match" rate. It was found that after the database had been in operation for more than seven years it was responsible on average for achieving convictions in close to one percent of reported burglaries, a figure that included the additional convictions developed from the intelligence that the database provided. Having funded a DNA regime from public monies, it may be time for policymakers in Australia to critically reassess expectations for the impact that DNA databases may have on volume crime levels and to focus efforts on those crimes most likely to be solved by the application of DNA testing.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_US
dc.publisher.placeSydneyen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~content=t779637219~link=coveren_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom73en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto86en_US
dc.relation.ispartofedition2005en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Journal of Forensic Sciencesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume37en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode390404en_US
dc.titleD.N.A. Databases and Property Crime: A False Promise?en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Criminology and Criminal Justiceen_US
gro.date.issued2005
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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