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dc.contributor.authorWest, Nicen_US
dc.contributor.authorPyne, D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKyd, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRenshaw, Gillianen_US
dc.contributor.authorFricker, P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCripps, Allanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:01:35Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:01:35Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2011-09-07T06:12:08Z
dc.identifier.issn14730480en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bjsm.2008.046532en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/22113
dc.description.abstractWe conducted a prospective observational study comparing salivary lactoferrin and lysozyme concentration over five months (chronic changes) in elite rowers (n=17, mean age 24.3 ᠴ.0y) with sedentary individuals (controls) (n=18, mean age = 27.2 ᠷ.1 y) and a graded exercise test to exhaustion (acute changes) with a cohort of elite rowers (n=11, mean age 24.7 ᠴ.1). Magnitudes of differences and changes were interpreted as a standardized (Cohen's) effect size (ES). Lactoferrin concentration in the observational study was approximately 60% lower in rowers than control subjects at baseline (7.9 ᠱ.2 姮ml-1 mean ᠓EM, 19.4 ᠵ.6 姮ml-1, P=0.05, ES=0.68, 'moderate') and at the midpoint of the season (6.4 ᠱ.4 姮ml-1 mean ᠓EM, 21.5 ᠴ.2 姮ml-1, P=0.001, ES=0.89, 'moderate'). The concentration of lactoferrin at the end of the study was not statistically significant (P=0.1) between the groups. There was no significant difference between rowers and control subjects in lysozyme concentration during the study. There was a 50% increase in the concentration of lactoferrin (P=0.05, ES=1.04, 'moderate') and 55% increase in lysozyme (P=0.01, ES=3.0, 'very large') from pre-exercise to exhaustion in the graded exercise session. Lower concentrations of these proteins may be indicative of an impairment of innate protection of the upper respiratory tract. Increased salivary lactoferrin and lysozyme concentration following exhaustive exercise may be due to a transient activation response that increases protection in the immediate post exercise period.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent194215 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group Ltden_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://bjsm.bmj.com/en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom227en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto231en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBritish Journal of Sports Medicineen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume44en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchInnate Immunityen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110707en_US
dc.titleThe effect of exercise on innate mucosal immunityen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Allied Health Sciencesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2008. The attached file is posted here with permission of the copyright owners for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted. For information about this journal please refer to the publisher's website or contact the authors.en_AU
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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