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dc.contributor.convenorAustralian Collaborative Education Networken_AU
dc.contributor.authorBrimble, Marken_US
dc.contributor.authorCameron, Craigen_US
dc.contributor.authorFreudenberg, Bretten_US
dc.contributor.editorACENen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-04T15:01:11Z
dc.date.available2017-04-04T15:01:11Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.date.modified2009-04-17T05:29:43Z
dc.identifier.refuriwww.acen.edu.auen_AU
dc.identifier.doihttp://www.acen.edu.au/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&layout=blog&id=40&Itemid=66en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/22167
dc.description.abstractIn recent years concerns have been raised about a gap emerging between graduate attributes and what industry requires (Yap, 1997; Albrecht and Sack, 2000). This is often referred to as a lack of 'employment readiness' of students and the need to engage industry with students and the curriculum. Such a concern was highlighted in the 2007 report titled 'Graduate Employability Skills' prepared for the Business, Industry and Higher Education Collaboration Council. While work integrated learning attempts to address this issue, it is questionable how successful this is if students are not adequately prepared prior to their placement. In an attempt to address this concern a Professional Development Program (the 'PDP') was developed. The PDP is integrated into the degree program and is designed to systematically develop students' learning, employment and generic skills and supplements their theoretical studies. It is argued that this integration of the PDP permeating the Degree enhances students' employment readiness. In addition, the PDP created other tangential benefits to the students and the university in terms of student engagement and motivation. This paper details the procedures that have been developed, and provides preliminary evidence on the impact of the first part of the PDP. It will be argued by the authors that to attain the possible benefits of a WIL program it is critical that practices and support mechanisms are adopted to emphases the 'I - that is, the integration of work and learning.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent50158 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherWACE/ACENen_US
dc.publisher.placeSydneyen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.acen.edu.auen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameWACE Asia Pacific Conferenceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleWork Integrated Learning (WIL): Transforming Futures: Practice… Pedagogy…Partnershipsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2008-09-30en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2008-10-03en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationSydneyen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode330206en_US
dc.titleIt’s all about ‘I’: Implementing ‘integration’ into a WIL programen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.date.issued2008
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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