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dc.contributor.authorHerington, Carmelen_US
dc.contributor.authorWeaven, Scotten_US
dc.contributor.editorAlex C. Michalosen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:52:58Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:52:58Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.date.modified2011-06-30T08:41:01Z
dc.identifier.issn01674544en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10551-007-9451-zen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/22298
dc.description.abstractABSTRACT. In this article, cluster analysis is used to explore the conflicting results reported when the Defining Issues Test is used to explain moral reasoning ability in business situations. Using a convenience sample, gender, age, work experience, and ethics training were examined to determine their impact on the level of moral reasoning ability as measured by the Defining Issues Test. Using the whole sample, a significant difference was found for average P scores reported for males and females, but no significant differences were found based on age, work experience, and ethics training. However, the sample fell into distinct clusters that identified distinct male and female groupings. While females naturally fell into two distinct high- and low-moral reasoning ability clusters, male clusters were dominated more by work experience and ethics training. Clearly there are other factors mitigating the level of moral reasoning ability for males which require further exploration. The findings suggest that while the P score provides an initial point of comparison, the real benefit to the test is in exploring what is different for males and females in terms of training needs, and the impact of work experience on the moral reasoning ability, and most importantly, how to make ethics training enticing. Recommendations for future research are also discussed.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSpringer Netherlandsen_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom499en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto514en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Business Ethicsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume80en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode350204en_US
dc.titleImproving Consistency for DIT Results Using Cluster Analysisen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, Department of Marketingen_US
gro.date.issued2008
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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