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dc.contributor.authorDavies, Saraen_US
dc.contributor.editorCaroline Soperen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:28:47Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:28:47Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.date.modified2009-10-22T21:48:59Z
dc.identifier.issn00205850en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1468-2346.2008.00704.xen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/22321
dc.description.abstractOver the past decade there has been an increased awareness in the field of international relations of the potential impact of an infectious disease epidemic on national security. While states' attempts to combat infectious disease have a long history, what is new in this area is the adoption at the international level of securitized responses regarding the containment of infectious disease. This article argues that the securitization of infectious disease by states and the World Health Organization (WHO) has led to two key developments. First, the WHO has had to assert itself as the primary actor that all states, particularly western states, can rely upon to contain the threat of infectious diseases. The WHO's apparent success in this is evidenced by the development of the Global Outbreak Alert Response Network (GOARN), which has led to arguments that the WHO has emerged as the key authority in global health governance. The second outcome that this article seeks to explore is the development of the WHO's authority in the area of infectious disease surveillance. In particular, is GOARN a representation of the WHO's consummate authority in the area of coordinating infectious disease response or is GOARN the product of the WHO's capitulation to western states' concerns with preventing infectious disease outbreaks from reaching their borders and as a result, are arguments expressing the authority of the WHO in infectious disease response premature?en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Published on behalf of Chatham House (Royal Institute of International Affairsen_US
dc.publisher.placeLondonen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0020-5850en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom295en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto313en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Affairsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume84en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode360105en_US
dc.titleSecuritizing Infectious Diseaseen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.date.issued2008
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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