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dc.contributor.convenorRobin Welcomme (Chair)
dc.contributor.authorArthington, Angela
dc.contributor.authorTharme, R.
dc.contributor.authorBrizga, S.
dc.contributor.authorPusey, Bradley
dc.contributor.authorKennard, Mark
dc.contributor.editorRobin Welcomme and T. Petr
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:34:35Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:34:35Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.date.modified2009-12-03T06:03:59Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/2232
dc.description.abstractWorldwide there is growing awareness of the pivotal role of the flow regime (hydrology) as a key 'driver' of the ecology of rivers and their associated floodplain wetlands. Ecological processes related to flow and other factors govern the ecosystem goods and services that rivers provide to humans, such as flood attenuation, water purification, production of fish and other foods and marketable goods. Protecting and restoring river flow regimes and hence the ecosystems they support by providing environmental flows has become a major aspect of river basin management. Over 200 approaches for determining environmental flows now exist and they are used or proposed for use in more than 50 countries worldwide. Most methodologies currently used in Australia and southern Africa and increasingly in other countries, are holistic in their scope, recognising that it is necessary to provide water for aquatic ecosystems from source to sea and for all water-dependent ecological components. This paper provides a brief history of the development of environmental flow methods and identifies the main features and strengths of each, giving most emphasis to holistic or ecosystem methodologies. We then present an overview of research initiatives needed to enhance these approaches and improve their capacity to predict the ecological, social and economic consequences of change in river flow regimes.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent508242 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherFood and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
dc.publisher.placeBangkok
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.fao.org/
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.fao.org/docrep/007/ad526e/ad526e00.HTM
dc.relation.ispartof0
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameSecond International Symposium for the Management of Large Rivers for Fisheries
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleProceedings of the Second International Symposium on the Mamagement of Large Rivers for Fisheries
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2003-02-11
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2003-02-14
dc.relation.ispartoflocationPhnom Penh, Kingxom of Cambodia
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHistory and Archaeology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode21
dc.titleEnvironmental flow assessment with emphasis on holostic methodologies
dc.typeConference output
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conferences
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publications
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environment
gro.rights.copyright© 2004 Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. The attached file is posted here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher, for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted. For information about this conference please refer to the conference's website or contact the authors.
gro.date.issued2004
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorArthington, Angela H.
gro.griffith.authorKennard, Mark J.
gro.griffith.authorPusey, Bradley J.


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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