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dc.contributor.authorClarke, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.editorNiklas Swantsromen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-04T18:33:42Z
dc.date.available2017-04-04T18:33:42Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.date.modified2011-07-22T06:35:49Z
dc.identifier.issn16534212en_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://www.chinaeurasia.org/archive/47-2008/89-volume-6-no-2-2008.htmlen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/22347
dc.description.abstractDespite the turning of the international spotlight on the region courtesy of 9/11, the question as to what drives China's power and imperatives in Central Asia (as elsewhere in the world) remain a matter of debate. This article argues that there is a largely complementary relationship between what may be termed China's Xinjiang, Central Asia and grand strategy-derived interests. Key to balancing these interests has been Beijing's post-1991 attempt to utilize Xinjiang's pivotal geopolitical position to simultaneously integrate Xinjiang and expand its influence in Central Asia. In particular, the article suggests that the integration of Xinjiang with Central Asia grants China significant security, economic and strategic benefits that serve two purposes - the consolidation of China's control of Xinjiang and the expansion of Chinese power in Central Asia - which contribute to Beijing's quest for a "peaceful rise" to great power status.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent146479 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherCentral Asia-Caucasus Institute and Silk Road Studies Programen_US
dc.publisher.placeStockholmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom89en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto111en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofjournalChina and Eurasia Forum Quarterlyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume6en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode360199en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode360105en_US
dc.titleChina’s Integration of Xinjiang with Central Asia: Securing a "Silk Road" to Great Power Status?en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, Department of International Business and Asian Studiesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the author 2008. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this journal please refer to the journal's website or contact the author.en_AU
gro.date.issued2008
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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