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dc.contributor.authorCao, Q
dc.contributor.authorYu, Q
dc.contributor.authorConnell, DW
dc.contributor.editorJohn Lester, Roy Harrison
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:06:39Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:06:39Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.date.modified2009-12-04T05:20:19Z
dc.identifier.issn0959-3330
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09593330802393244
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/22505
dc.description.abstractSteroid estrogens are one of the most important groups of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) which can cause adverse effects on wildlife species and humans. Natural estrogens, including estrone (E1) and estradiol (E2), and synthetic estrogen 17-ethinylestradiol (EE2) together contribute to most of the estrogenic activity in sewage effluents and receiving water. Degradation, particularly aerobic biodegradation was found to be the dominant removal mechanism in these environments. There are a number of factors such as temperature, pH, SRT, HRT and biomass concentration that can affect the rate of biodegradation. This paper reports the results of investigations in to the relationship between the equivalent biomass concentration and degradation rate constants for compounds E1, E2 and EE2 in various environments. It was found that a higher biomass concentration leads to higher rate constants, and relatively good linear correlations (R2 =0.73, 0.79 and 0.73) between the logarithm of the rate constants and the corresponding logarithm equivalent biomass concentration (EBC) values were obtained.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Ltd.
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/09593330.asp
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1321
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1330
dc.relation.ispartofissue12
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEnvironmental Technology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume29
dc.rights.retentionN
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Technologies
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEngineering
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode090703
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode05
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode06
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode09
dc.titleDegradation rate constants of steroids in sewage treatment works and receiving water
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environment
gro.rights.copyright© 2008 Taylor & Francis. This is the author-manuscript version of the paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.date.issued2008
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorConnell, Des W.
gro.griffith.authorYu, Jimmy J.
gro.griffith.authorCao, Qiming


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