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dc.contributor.authorBuckley, Ralfen_US
dc.contributor.authorCarmody, Joanneen_US
dc.contributor.authorKing, Narelleen_US
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Jessicaen_US
dc.contributor.editorAlan T Bull (Editor-in-Chief)en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-04T21:08:51Z
dc.date.available2017-04-04T21:08:51Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.date.modified2010-08-30T07:01:12Z
dc.identifier.issn09603115en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10531-008-9448-7en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/22535
dc.description.abstractProtected areas are key to conservation of biodiversity, and Australia is one of the world's megadiverse regions. Monitoring programs provide the information to assess the state of conservation resources, the severity of threats and the success of management responses. Here we compare the management priorities, monitoring priorities and actual monitoring practices of protected area management agencies in Australia, using four sets of data at continental scale and five at a more restricted regional scale. We track changes over a period of several years and focus at successively finer levels of detail. At both continental and regional scales, most management plans emphasise fire, invasive species and visitor management; and most monitoring programmes refer to visitor numbers and impacts as well as species and ecosystems. There is only a weak match, however, between reported management priorities and actual monitoring programmes; and the effectiveness of management responses is rarely monitored. The level of detail in visitor monitor programmes varies considerably: most parks count visitors, but few know what those visitors do. Threats from fire and invasive species receive more attention that those from recreation. At regional scale, the proportion of parks with defined monitoring programmes and priorities increased significantly from 2003/2004 to 2006/2007. Whilst only a proportion of protected areas monitor endangered species populations, for those that do this is the parameter reported in most detail, with many parks reporting single records of single individuals. Some parks also maintain anecdotal records of rare species outside routine monitoring programs.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSpringer Netherlandsen_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom3589en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto3606en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBiodiversity and Conservationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume17en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode300801en_US
dc.titleMonitoring for management of conservation and recreation in Australian protected areasen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.date.issued2008
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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