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dc.contributor.convenorGillian Whitehouseen_AU
dc.contributor.authorHowes, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.editorGillian Whitehouseen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T09:16:07Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T09:16:07Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.date.modified2009-04-26T06:47:54Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://www.polsis.uq.edu.au/apsa-2008-conference-homepageen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/22581
dc.description.abstractHow can we make government work better? To say that Australia has a complicated system of government would be something of an understatement - there is a multitude of departments, agencies and authorities operating at the local, state and national level. Sometimes the functions of these organisations clash and sometimes they overlap - either option can generate major problems when delivering services. These problems were recognised by the 'Australian Governance' stream of the recently held Australia 2020 Summit. As the demands on the public sector grow, and as resources become increasingly stretched, there is a growing impetus to improve the situation. In the absence of a major restructuring of the whole federal system, one solution may be to encourage collaboration within and between different levels of government, particularly at the regional level. This paper outlines some of the key barriers to such collaboration that have been uncovered by the Engaged Government Project. It also offers some strategies for overcoming these barriers based on the author's research into environmental policy implementation across different jurisdictions under the Australian federal system. Overall it is argued that collaborative initiatives will mainly be useful when the issue to be addressed is given a sufficiently high priority, when it cuts across administrative jurisdictions, if it requires a multi-disciplinary approach, and when it requires more resources than can be provided by a single organisation. Further, collaborative projects that are undertaken will have the best chance of success if they are supported by adequate institutional communication, authority and resources.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent120244 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSchool of Political Science & International Studies, University of Queenslanden_US
dc.publisher.placeBrisbaneen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.polsis.uq.edu.au/apsa-2008-conference-homepageen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencename2008 Australasian Political Science Association Annual Conferenceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleAustralian Political Studies Association Conference. Proceedingsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2008-07-06en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2008-07-09en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationHilton Hotel, Brisbaneen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode360201en_US
dc.titleRethinking Governance: Lessons in collaboration from environmental policyen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the author 2008. The attached file is posted here with permission of the copyright owner for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted. For information about this conference please refer to the publisher's website or contact the author.en_AU
gro.date.issued2008
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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