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dc.contributor.authorZacarias, Katherineen_US
dc.contributor.authorFisher, Ronen_US
dc.contributor.authorGapp, Roden_US
dc.contributor.editorP.J. Singh, D. Prajogo, P. O'Neill, S. Rahmanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:08:51Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:08:51Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.date.modified2009-06-18T08:49:58Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/22723
dc.description.abstractAustralia's reputation for the quality of its coal has led to this commodity becoming a major input to the country's economy. About 88 million tonnes out of Australia's annual port capacity of 270 million tonnes of coal are shipped through the Port of Newcastle, which claims to be the world's largest coal handling port. However, capacity constraints at various parts of the supply chain threaten export shipments of coal. In the past demand for coal has been regular and constant. However, recent rapid increases in demand, attributed mainly to an increasing Chinese market, have pushed the existing system beyond its capacity. An outcome of the inability of the coal supply chain to meet demand has been the increasing number of vessels waiting to enter the port. In 2002, the number of vessels anchored off the port often exceeded 50 daily. In an attempt to reduce vessel waiting time, and the burgeoning cost of demurrage, a vessel priority system for loading was introduced. The system appeared to be effective, with the daily number of vessels anchored off the port reducing to single figures. However, in 2007 the number of vessels awaiting entry to the port has again risen to more than 50 on most days, leading to cuts in export quotas [1]. Exacerbating the situation are orders for coal totaling 120 million tonnes for shipment in 2008. This ongoing research, initially based on newspaper reports and ACCC documents, is a qualitative exploratory case study that investigates the issues affecting the transportation, loading and shipment of coal through the Port of Newcastle, Australia. The research aims to identify why so many ships are waiting to load coal, and how the length of the queue may be reduced. However, reports widely circulated do not accurately reflect the situation at the Port. Following unstructured, formal interviews involving several key people in the coal supply chain a different story has emerged.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent50345 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherMonash Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeMelbourneen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencename6th ANZAM Operations Supply Chain and Management Symposium 2008en_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleProceedings of the ANZAM Operations, Supply Chain & Services Management Symposium 2008en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2008-06-08en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2008-06-10en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationGold Coast, Australiaen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode350299en_US
dc.titleLies, damned lies and newspaper reports: investigating coal shipments through the port of Newcastleen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, Dept of Employment Relations and Human Resourcesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2008 Australian & New Zealand Academy of Management. The attached file is posted here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher, for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted. Use hypertext link for access to publisher's website.en_AU
gro.date.issued2008
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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