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dc.contributor.convenorChristine Beasleyen_US
dc.contributor.authorKane, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.editorJonathon Louthen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T10:10:26Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T10:10:26Z
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/2273
dc.description.abstractPolitical leaders confronting ethnic, cultural or religious divides face a formidable set of choices. One temptation is to exploit and magnify enmity in order to secure one's leadership position and unify supporters. Bellicose leaders tend to appear strong, pure and decisive, and open conflict often binds partisan followers more firmly together. Peacemakers, on the other hand, because they must deal and compromise with the hated enemy, inevitably invite charges of weakness or betrayal. They invariably alienate their most radical factions. In this paper I will use a case study of the successful transition to post-apartheid South Africa to extract certain general conditions under which peacemaking leadership may become effective. In particular I will argue that a condition for successful peacemaking is the existence of a comparable leader on the other side. Opposing leaders must reach out across the divide and negotiate acceptable compromises while managing their own political bases. Whether they despise or respect one another, they must create some common middle ground representing a constituency for peace from which they may isolate and neutralise their own extreme wings. Failing this, they will be dragged inexorably back into the cycle of conflict.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent169136 bytes
dc.format.extent42769 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Adelaideen_US
dc.publisher.placeSouth Australiaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.adelaide.edu.au/apsa/papers/en_US
dc.relation.ispartof0en_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameAustralasian Political Studies Association Conference 2004en_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleAPSA Conference - Refeered Papersen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2004-09-29en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2004-10-01en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationAdelaideen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode360102en_US
dc.titleLeadership and Conflict: Some Necessary Conditions for Peacemakingen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, School of Government and International Relationsen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the author[s] 2004. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the conference's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2015-06-04T03:33:54Z
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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