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dc.contributor.authorSun, Jing
dc.contributor.authorMohay, Heather
dc.contributor.authorO'Callaghan, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:17:39Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:17:39Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.date.modified2010-06-29T06:44:04Z
dc.identifier.issn0378-3782
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2008.10.005
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/22741
dc.description.abstractBackground: Executive function (EF) emerges in infancy and continues to develop throughout childhood.Executive dysfunction is believed to contribute to learning and attention problems in children at school age.Children born very preterm are more prone to these problems than their full-term peers.Aim: To compare EF in very preterm and full-term infants at 8 months after expected date of delivery. Subjects: 37 very preterm infants without identified disabilities, and 74 gender and age matched healthy fullterm infants. The very preterm infants were all =32 weeks gestation and b1250 g birthweight. Outcome measures: EF tasks which measured working memory, inhibition of distraction, and planning at 8 months after expected date of delivery. Results: The very preterm infants performed significantly more poorly than the full-term infants on all measures of executive function. No significant differences were found between very preterm and full-term infants on any of potentially confounding variables of, infant temperament, maternal education, family income and maternal psychological wellbeing. Very preterm infants had significantly lower scores on the Mental Development Index (MDI) and Psychomotor Development Index (PDI) on the Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID II), however when this was partialled out the differences in EF scores remained. Medical complications, lower birthweight and lower gestation age were all found to adversely affect the performance of very preterm infants on executive function tasks. Conclusion: Very preterm infants performed more poorly than full-term infants on measures of EF. Further follow up studies are required to investigate whether EF measures in infancy can predict learning and attention outcome at school age.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent144685 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.publisher.placeIreland
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/03783782
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom225
dc.relation.ispartofpageto230
dc.relation.ispartofissue4
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEarly Human Development
dc.relation.ispartofvolume85
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPaediatrics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPaediatrics and Reproductive Medicine
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111403
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1114
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1702
dc.titleA comparison of executive function in very preterm and term infants at 8 months corrected age
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Medicine
gro.rights.copyright© 2008 Elsevier. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorSun, Jing


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