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dc.contributor.authorHaugh, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.editorIstvan Kecskesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:59:51Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:59:51Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.date.modified2009-05-08T08:59:00Z
dc.identifier.issn1612295Xen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1515/IP.2008.011en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/22865
dc.description.abstractThe standard model of communication in linguistic pragmatics is founded on the assumption that "successful" communication involves the addressee making inferences about the intentions of the speaker. Miscommunication of implicatures thus presumably arises when the addressee does not correctly infer the speaker's intention. In this paper, however, it is argued that this view of the (mis)communication of implicatures does not adequately account for the manner in which intentions may become the subject of discursive dispute in interaction thereby giving rise to diverging interpretings of implicatures. Drawing from an analysis of the "uncovered meat" comments made by Sheik Taj Din al-Hilali and the ensuing controversy over what was implied by them, it is argued that to label such an incident as simply a misunderstanding of the speaker's intentions is misleading. Instead, it is suggested that the way in which Hilali's comments were shifted from a specific audience in the Muslim community to wider Australian society by the media engendered discursive dispute over Hilali's intentions, and thus gave rise to the co-constitution of diverging interpretings of what was implied by Hilali. Building a model of the communication of implicatures must therefore move beyond the received view that it involves "correctly" inferring the intentions of speakers to encompass a broader view where both converging and diverging interpretings of implicatures emerge through their conjoint co-constitution in interaction.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent164249 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherMouton de Gruyteren_US
dc.publisher.placeBerlinen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.degruyter.de/journals/intcultpragm/detailEn.cfmen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom201en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto228en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalIntercultural Pragmaticsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume5en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode380203en_US
dc.titleIntention and diverging interpretings of implicature in the "uncovered meat" sermonen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Languages and Linguisticsen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2008 Walter de Gruyter & Co. KG Publishers. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the publisher's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2008
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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