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dc.contributor.authorBranch, Saraen_US
dc.contributor.editorMichelle Barker, Michael Sheehan, Sheryl Ramsayen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T10:03:17Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T10:03:17Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.date.modified2012-09-06T22:09:26Z
dc.identifier.issn14405377en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/22979
dc.description.abstractDespite the recent increase in focus on workplace bullying by both researchers and practitioners, there is still considerable confusion as to how workplace bullying is similar or different to other counter-productive behaviours in the workplace. However, in order for researchers and practitioners to be able to research, prevent and address workplace bullying, it needs to be identified clearly and differentiated from other counterproductive behaviours. Within this paper we explore the similarities and differences between the concept of workplace bullying and alternative terms like incivility and harassment. We argue it is the persistency of the inappropriate behaviours is the primary difference between workplace bullying and other counter-productive behaviours. This paper contributes to the discussion of 'Can we differentiate workplace bullying?' by adapting Andersson and Pearson's (1999) model of antisocial behaviours. Findings from an interview study are also used to further clarify these definitional questions. We propose that this model could form part of a comprehensive antisocial behaviour policy, which outlines and explains the similarities and differences between workplace bullying, harassment, workplace violence and aggression as well as incivility. With the intended outcome to clarify the dimensions of workplace bullying as a phenomenon and thereby assisting employees and Management to identify negative behaviours early so that they can take appropriate action and stop the negative spiral and impact of such behaviours.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent153989 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Southern Queenslanden_US
dc.publisher.placeToowoombaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.usq.edu.au/business-law/research/ijob/articlesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto17en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Organisational Behaviouren_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume13en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode350201en_US
dc.titleYou say Tomatoe and I say Tomato: Can we differentiate between Workplace Bullying and other Counterproductive behaviours?en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the author 2008. The attached file is posted here with permission of the copyright owner for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted. For information about this journal please refer to the publisher’s website or contact the author.en_US
gro.date.issued2008
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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