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dc.contributor.authorLivingston, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Annaen_US
dc.contributor.authorAllard, Troyen_US
dc.contributor.authorOgilvie, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.editorPaul Mazerolleen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T08:11:01Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T08:11:01Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.date.modified2011-11-10T06:58:52Z
dc.identifier.issn00048658en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1375/acri.41.3.345en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/22981
dc.description.abstractA considerable amount of international research has adopted a criminal careers framework to improve our understanding of offending patterns across the life course. Recent innovations in statistical modelling techniques such as Semi-Parametric Group-based Method (SPGM) have provided researchers with tools to model offending trajectories. While this framework and these techniques may improve our understanding of life course offending patterns, few Australian studies have adopted such an approach. SPGM was employed in the current study to model the offending patterns of the 1983-84 Queensland offender cohort (n = 4,470) to address three research questions: (1) How many distinct offending trajectories could be identified and what was the nature of these trajectories? (2) How were sex, Indigenous status, socioeconomic disadvantage, and remoteness related to offending trajectory membership? and (3) Are juvenile offending trajectories predictors of adult offending? Findings indicated that there were three distinct groups of juvenile offenders: Early Peaking-Moderate Offenders, Late Onset-Moderate Offenders, and Chronic Offenders. Males and Indigenous offenders were overrepresented in the chronic offending trajectory. Support for the utility of the model was found, as Chronic Offenders were more likely to have offended as adults. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed and the need for further trajectory research within an Australian context is emphasised.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent153719 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherAustralian Academic Pressen_US
dc.publisher.placeBowen Hills, Qlden_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://anj.sagepub.com/en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom345en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto363en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Criminologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume41en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCauses and Prevention of Crimeen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160201en_US
dc.titleUnderstanding Juvenile Offending Trajectoriesen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, Key Centre for Ethics, Law, Justice and Governanceen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2008 SAGE Publications. This is the author-manuscript version of the paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2008
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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