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dc.contributor.authorBennett, Andyen_US
dc.contributor.editorErin K. Sharpe and Brett D. Lashuaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T12:53:44Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T12:53:44Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.date.modified2012-02-09T22:35:38Z
dc.identifier.issn14927713en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/14927713.2008.9651410en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/22996
dc.description.abstractThis article addresses the continuing appeal of ageing rock icons, for example, Pink Floyd, Robert Plant and Jimmy Page, for contemporary youth audiences. The article argues that much of the attraction of such artists for young audiences stems from the way in which they are used to position the development-and cultural resonance- of a late-twentieth-century rock history (of which young fans have no direct memory or experience). In examining this contention, the article considers the significance of issues such as the relevance of late 1960s and early 1970s rock music in parent-child relationships, the function of visual media in the historical representation of rock icons in the "post-digital" age, the significance of classic album and tribute band performances in portraying "freeze-frame" fashion the work of ageing rock icons, and the function of "classic rock" as the signature tune of a golden age.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent102288 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherWilfred Laurier University Pressen_US
dc.publisher.placeCanadaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom259en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto278en_US
dc.relation.ispartofeditionNAen_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalLeisure / Loisiren_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume32en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSociology not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160899en_US
dc.title"Things They Do Look Awful Cool": Ageing Rock Icons and Contemporary Youth Audiencesen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Humanities, Languages and Social Sciencesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2008 Routledge. This is an electronic version of an article published in Leisure Vol. 32(2), 2008, pp. 259-278. Leisure is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com with the open URL of your article.en_US
gro.date.issued2008
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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