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dc.contributor.convenorClaire Pomery
dc.contributor.authorIsakhan, Benjamin
dc.contributor.editorGillian Whitehouse
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-31T23:35:54Z
dc.date.available2017-08-31T23:35:54Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.date.modified2009-05-14T10:01:06Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://www.polsis.uq.edu.au/index.html?page=52174
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/23016
dc.description.abstractThe toppling of Saddam in 2003 brought with it the re-emergence of the free press in Iraq. This has seen Iraq shift from only a handful of state media outlets that served as propaganda machines, to a vast array of Iraqi-owned newspapers, radio stations and television channels which are being fervently produced and avidly consumed across the nation. As is to be expected, there are several problems that have accompanied such a divergent, ad-hoc and highly volatile media landscape. Leaving aside important issues such as the dangers faced by Iraqi journalists and the lack of appropriate press laws, this paper focuses instead on the influence of both foreign and domestic political bodies on the post-Saddam Iraqi media sector. Among the foreign influences are Iran, Saudi Arabia and the United States, all of which fund, control and manipulate various Iraqi media outlets. Not surprisingly, the United States has been the most active, using both overt and clandestine propaganda methods as well as forced closure to control the Iraqi media sector. Unfortunately, such measures are not limited to those governments which exist outside Iraq's borders, with both the Iraqi government and the Kurdish regional authority having used similar means to control and even silence Iraq's nascent public sphere. This paper concludes by noting the irony of limiting press freedoms in Iraq during this crucial phase in its transition from despotism to democracy.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherUniversity of Queensland
dc.publisher.placeQueensland, Australia
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.auspsa.org.au/
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameAustralasian Political Science Association 2008 Conference
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleAustralasian Political Science Association (APSA)Conference
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2008-07-06
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2008-07-09
dc.relation.ispartoflocationQueensland, Australia
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode369999
dc.titleMediated Hegemony: Interference in the post-Saddam Iraqi media sector
dc.typeConference output
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conferences
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publications
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Humanities, Languages and Social Sciences
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2008. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this conference please refer to the conference’s website or contact the author.
gro.date.issued2008
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorIsakhan, Benjamin


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