Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMcKay, Belindaen_US
dc.contributor.editorBelinda McKayen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T08:27:36Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T08:27:36Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.date.modified2010-11-02T07:03:59Z
dc.identifier.issn13218166en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/23019
dc.description.abstractFrancis Adams (1862-1893) first published 'The Red Snake' in the Christmas edition of the Brisbane Boomerang on 24 December 1888, and later revised it for inclusion in a collection of his short stories, Australian Life, which was published by Chapman and Hall in London in 1892. Adams's careful selection, arrangement and revision of his stories enable Australian Life to work effectively as a retrospective collection for an English audience, but it is illuminating to look at the original versions in their Australian context. 'The Red Snake', which Adams chose to open Australian Life, is an enigmatic text. The original version makes unequivocal references to local people, places and events; in particular, it offers in Frank Melvil, a member of the 'old original colonial school', a thinly veiled representation of the infamous Frank Jardine of Somerset on Cape York Peninsula. However, Adams uses these 'real life' allusions also as a starting point for an exploration of larger questions of civilisation and modernity. The story recounts a brutal massacre, but makes no direct judgment of Melvil's actions. There is a pervasive motif of homoerotic attraction, but the text's signification of such desire is evasive in the manner of other fin de si裬e texts. Technically, the story is innovative in the complexity of its first person narration, its interest in the fleeting moment, its anticipation of 'stream of consciousness' and its lack of closure. 'The Red Snake' holds up a mirror to colonial Queensland, but is also worth resurrecting as a fine early example of the modern short story.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent283445 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherUniversity of Queensland Pressen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.griffith.edu.au/arts-languages-criminology/centre-cultural-research/publications/queensland-reviewen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom97en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto109en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalQueensland Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume15en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode420202en_US
dc.titleNarrating Colonial Queensland: Francis Adams, Frank Jardine and 'The Red Snake'en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Humanities, Languages and Social Sciencesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2008 University of Queensland Press. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2008
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record