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dc.contributor.authorO'Faircheallaigh, Ciaranen_US
dc.contributor.editorPaula Bownasen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:33:11Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:33:11Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.date.modified2012-02-10T02:18:41Z
dc.identifier.issn0012155Xen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1467-7660.2008.00467.xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/23184
dc.description.abstractMining and other forms of industrial development can result in profound and often irreversible damage to the cultural heritage of indigenous peoples. Fear of such damage regularly results in indigenous opposition to development and, in many cases, to delays in construction of development projects or even to their abandonment. Government legislation has generally proved ineffective in protecting indigenous heritage. An alternative means of achieving protection arises from the growing recognition of indigenous land rights and the opportunity this creates for negotiations with mining companies regarding the terms on which indigenous landowners may support development. To evaluate the potential efficacy of negotiated approaches, this article analyses forty-one agreements between mining companies and Aboriginal peoples in Australia. It argues that negotiated agreements do have the potential to protect indigenous cultural heritage, but only where underlying weaknesses in the bargaining position of indigenous peoples are addressed. This finding has wider implications given that negotiation and agreement making are increasingly being promoted as a means of addressing the structural disadvantages faced by indigenous peoples and of resolving conflicts between them and dominant societies.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent141965 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBlackwellen_US
dc.publisher.placeOxforden_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom25en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto51en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalDevelopment and Changeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume39en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolitical Science not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160699en_US
dc.titleNegotiating Cultural Heritage? Aboriginal–Mining Company Agreements in Australiaen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, School of Government and International Relationsen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2008 Institute of Social Studies. Published by Blackwell Publishing. This is the author-manuscript version of the paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. The definitive version is available at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/en_US
gro.date.issued2008
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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