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dc.contributor.authorKebbell, Mark
dc.contributor.authorAlison, Laurence
dc.contributor.authorHurren Paterson, Emily
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-05T01:57:53Z
dc.date.available2019-04-05T01:57:53Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.date.modified2011-11-04T06:32:38Z
dc.identifier.issn1068316X
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10683160801950523
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/23301
dc.description.abstractForty-three convicted sex offenders read each of four different offence vignettes that involved a man forcing a female victim into sex and the offender's subsequent police interview. The experimental manipulation involved giving participants each of four different scenarios concerning how the police interviewed the offender. These were interviews characterized by humanity, dominance, displaying an understanding of sex offenders’ cognitive distortions, or a neutral, control interview. Participants were required to rate the interviews on a variety of dimensions, such as the offender's likelihood of confessing, and the fairness of the interview. Where participants were told the man had been interviewed with humanity and compassion, they rated the offender as more likely to confess and rated the interview as fairer than the other conditions. In contrast, participants rated the offender interviewed with a dominant approach as less likely to confess, and for this procedure to be less fair than the other conditions. Displaying an understanding of sex offenders’ cognitive distortions appeared to have had no influence on perceived likelihood of confessions but was perceived to make the crime appear less serious.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent109133 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherRoutledge
dc.publisher.placeOxford, UK
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom435
dc.relation.ispartofpageto449
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPsychology, Crime and Law
dc.relation.ispartofvolume14
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchForensic Psychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLaw
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170104
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1602
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1801
dc.titleSex offenders’ perceptions of the effectiveness and fairness of humanity, dominance, and understanding of cognitive distortions in police interviews: A vignette study
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychology
gro.rights.copyright© 2008 Routledge. This is an electronic version of an article published in Psychology, Crime & Law Vol.14(5), 2008, pp. 435-449. Psychology, Crime & Law is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com with the open URL of your article.
gro.date.issued2008
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHurren Paterson, Emily J.
gro.griffith.authorKebbell, Mark R.


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